Color in the Kitchen

Know Your Knives: An Illustrative Guide

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

Getting creative in the kitchen is one of my favorite past times, slicing and dicing my way through meals is part of the fun. Let's get to know knives a little better with this illustrative guide.

The Anatomy of a Culinary Knife

Knowing the right anatomy will help you when learning new skills and new knives, here is a diagram of the different parts of a knife.

Anatomy of a Knife

Know Your Knives

Get to know all the types of knives and their main uses to ensure you are safe and efficient when chopping and slicing.

Bread Knife

Bread Knife

Blade: Thick and deep with serrated edge
Uses:
Slicing your fresh, crusty bread loaf.

Carving Knife

Carving Knife

Blade: Thin, long narrow with a sharp point
Uses: Separating meat from a bone (use with carving fork)

Santoku Knife

Santoku

Blade: Broad and curves upwards toward tip, perfectly balanced
Uses: Everything, from chopping to slicing fruits and veggies

Cleaver

Cleaver

Blade: Thick, wide and heavy
Uses: Chop through thick meats

Chef's Knife

Chef's Knife

Blade: Broad and curves upwards toward tip
Uses:
Everything, from chopping to slicing fruits and veggies

Utility Knife

Utility Knife

Blade: Mid-sized and sharp sized, between paring and chef's
Uses: Various cutting, such as slicing vegetables

Paring Knife

Pairing Knife

Blade: Small and sharp
Uses: Intricate work, when more control is needed

Steak Knife

Steak Knife

Blade: Small and serrated
Uses: Cutting steaks at the dinner table

Boning Knife

Boning Knife

Blade: Long and flexible
Uses: Deboning meats

Stay Sharp

Sharpening and maintaining your knives is really important. Keeping them clean and dry is normal care, but sharpening regularly will also help maintain your knives. Not only will they last you longer, but they will be safer and easier to use. Whether using a whetstone or an electric sharpener, a sharp knife will cut more cleanly and easier making you less likely to slip and cut yourself! Be smart and work safely when handling and keep your knives sharp.

I can personally recommend the Dalstrong Premium Whetstone for a super sharp and clean edge. There is a learning curve for these whetstones, but it's really worth the effort and you'll appreciate your knives that much more.

Keep on Dicin'

Just like any skill the more you use and practice with your knife skills the better your will get. So keep slicing, dicing, chopping and cutting it up! And contact Brittany Gardner for any culinary or food related illustrations and design work.

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Know Your Knives: An Illustrative Guide

December 30, 2020
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